What is pending time on the Employee Leave Transactions window?

What is pending time on the Employee Leave Transactions window?

KB01-014

The pending option is for time that an employee can accrue but is not available to take by the employee yet.  For example, the first 90 days of employment may be probationary.  An employee can accrue their time; however it is not available to them until they complete the 90 day probation.  In this scenario, we would use a One Time waiting period and 90 days in the Leave Setup window.  

When the system calculates leave time during the first 90 days, the time appears in the pending field until it is available after the employee completes the 90-day probation.  In our setup the Accrual Based on date equals the hire date thus the 90-days is 90 days after the hire date.  On the Employee Leave Maintenance (Cards > Payroll > Leave) window you can see the system defaults the Accrual Based On Date as the Waiting Period Start Date and we have entered 90 days as the waiting period units.

CLM Pending 1

If you mark the option to Calculate Earned Time during Payroll Processing then in the pay period the employee reaches their 90-day anniversary the system will move the time from the pending to the earned field with a description of Pending Made Available. 

CLM Pending 2

If you do not mark Calculate Earned Time during Payroll Processing then you will use the Calculate Leave Accruals window to accrue time.  The system uses the Accrued Through Date on the Employee Leave Maintenance as the start date and the Accrued Through Date on the Calculate Leave Accruals window as the end date.  When the 90 day anniversary date is between the start date and the end date the time will move from the pending to the earned with a description of Pending Made Available.

Last Review: February 2, 2015 – Revision: 1.0

Applies To:

  • Comprehensive Leave Manager Microsoft Dynamics GP 2015
  • Comprehensive Leave Manager Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013
  • Comprehensive Leave Manager Microsoft Dynamics GP 2010

 

 

2017-01-08T13:23:34+00:00 September 23rd, 2014|0 Comments

Leave A Comment